Banned Books Week: The Power of Unsilenced Voices

Banned Books Week: The Power of Unsilenced Voices


Anthony Carter
Anthony Carter
Banned Books Week: The Power of Unsilenced...

Banned Books Week: The Power of Unsilenced Voices

This week (October 1st – October 7th) we celebrate Banned Books Week, an annual event that champions the freedom to read. It’s a time to highlight the value of free and open access to information. Banned Books Week brings together the entire book community — librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers of all types — in shared support of the freedom to seek and express ideas.

Famous Examples of Banned Books:

To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee – This classic novel has been challenged and banned due to its themes of racism, but is now one of the most taught books in the world – 70% of American school children study the text!

The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger – This book has previously been banned due to its language and themes of rebellion, but nowadays, it is the second most taught book in North America

1984 by George Orwell – The dystopian novel has been previously banned for its political themes and supposed pro-communist message

The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck – This book has been banned previously due to its portrayal of migrant workers during the Great Depression.

Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare – This classic tragedy – which our Year 9 pupils are currently studying – is presently banned in Florida  due to the state’s Parental Rights in Education Act! The state has also banned Macbeth (which our Year 11 students are currently revisiting) and Hamlet!

Why Were They Banned?

Books are often banned or challenged because they present ideas or content that some people find uncomfortable or disagree with. They may deal with difficult themes, or challenge the status quo. However, it’s important to remember that one of the fundamental principles of literature is to explore the human condition in all its complexity.

Why Should You Read Them?

Banned books often deal with important social issues and can provide a valuable perspective on the world. Reading these books can help us understand different viewpoints and experiences, promoting empathy and critical thinking. They challenge us to question our assumptions and broaden our horizons.

This Banned Books Week, pick up a previously banned book from the LRC!

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